Submarine cable map

TeleGeography’s submarine cable map is based on the data from:
https://github.com/telegeography/www.submarinecablemap.com

These data are based on our authoritative Global Bandwidth research. Visit https://www.submarinecablemap.com

Project example: here

https://submarine-cable-map-2019.telegeography.com/

Ημερομηνία δημοσίευσης: 11/4/2019

Δείτε πιο κάτω πως άλλαξε η Κύπρος μετά από τις έντονες βροχοπτώσεις των τελευταίων μηνών. Οι φωτογραφίες λήφθηκαν τις μέρες 4/4/2018 και 25/3/2019 και πάρθηκαν από το δορυφόρο sentinel.

See below how Cyprus changed after heavy rainfall. The photos were taken on 4/4/2018 and 25/3/2019 from the Sentinel satellite.

[image-comparator left=”https://mariosmsk.files.wordpress.com/2022/02/f3715-04042018_t.png” left_alt=”2018″ right=”https://mariosmsk.files.wordpress.com/2022/02/10b13-25032019_t.png”
right_alt=”2018″ ][/image-comparator]

Η αλλαγή της Κύπρου μέσα σε ένα χρόνο από τα μάτια του δορυφόρου / The transformation of Cyprus within a year from the eyes of the satellite

STOP Using Python 2


DEPRECATION: Python 2.7 will reach the end of its life on January 1st, 2020. Please upgrade your Python as Python 2.7 won’t be maintained after that date. A future version of pip will drop support for Python 2.7.

Python 2.0 was released on October 16, 2000, with many major new features, including a cycle-detecting garbage collector (in addition to reference counting) for memory management and support for Unicode. However, the most important change was to the development process itself, with a shift to a more transparent and community-backed process.[7]
Python 3.0, a major, backwards-incompatible release, was released on December 3, 2008[8] after a long period of testing. Many of its major features have also been backported to the backwards-compatible Python 2.6 and 2.7.[9]

Python 2.0 was released on 16 October 2000 with many major new features, including a cycle-detecting garbage collector and support for Unicode.[35]

Python 3.0 was released on 3 December 2008. It was a major revision of the language that is not completely backward-compatible.[36] Many of its major features were backported to Python 2.6.x[37] and 2.7.x version series. Releases of Python 3 include the 2to3 utility, which automates (at least partially) the translation of Python 2 code to Python 3.[38]


https://pythonclock.org/

Source